1. image: Download

    Gaza Strip compared to Austin
on a tangential note, there’s actually a Palestine in TX.

    Gaza Strip compared to Austin

    on a tangential note, there’s actually a Palestine in TX.

     
  2. 03:19 29th Jul 2014

    Notes: 32

    Reblogged from patternsofbehavior

    image: Download

    antigovernmentextremist:

Me after reading No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA and the Surveillance State by Glenn Greenwald.
Seriously go read this book right now. It reads like a spy thriller making it nearly impossible to put down. Greenwald’s commentary on the integral importance privacy has to a free society is a breath of fresh air.
Understanding the measures Edward Snowden, Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras took to bring the egregious abuses of power by the NSA and the elected members of our government makes the general population’s complacency and acceptance of these surveillance programs maddening. I kept finding myself shaking my head in disbelief, gazing off wondering how anyone could support these institutions, let alone go along with them. Greenwald and Snowden especially are heroes and it’s my hope that history will remember them as such.
What I think is the most important part of this book is how Greenwald illustrates how surveillance has historically never been used for “national security” and how it has almost exclusively been used to enhance the powers of the state. The NSA is no exception to this historical fact. Much of the book is dedicated to how the NSA and other intelligence agencies use their powers to spy on economic summits, political dissidents, heads of state and the social media accounts of average citizens around the world. The most disturbing of the revelations are how surveillance agencies are developing strategies to defame and destroy the reputations of those the state deems undesirable.
I have yet to encounter a writer that can so perfectly encapsulate the arguments not only for privacy but against dragnet, indiscriminate surveillance as Greenwald does in this book. His experience as a lawyer and as a journalist shines through in this scathing indictment of the NSA and the mainstream political media who act merely as mouthpieces for agents of the state who wish to completely eliminate privacy in the digital age.
Go read this book now.
Also check out my tags for the NSA, Glenn Greenwald, Edward Snowden, Surveillance and Privacy.

    antigovernmentextremist:

    Me after reading No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA and the Surveillance State by Glenn Greenwald.

    Seriously go read this book right now. It reads like a spy thriller making it nearly impossible to put down. Greenwald’s commentary on the integral importance privacy has to a free society is a breath of fresh air.

    Understanding the measures Edward Snowden, Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras took to bring the egregious abuses of power by the NSA and the elected members of our government makes the general population’s complacency and acceptance of these surveillance programs maddening. I kept finding myself shaking my head in disbelief, gazing off wondering how anyone could support these institutions, let alone go along with them. Greenwald and Snowden especially are heroes and it’s my hope that history will remember them as such.

    What I think is the most important part of this book is how Greenwald illustrates how surveillance has historically never been used for “national security” and how it has almost exclusively been used to enhance the powers of the state. The NSA is no exception to this historical fact. Much of the book is dedicated to how the NSA and other intelligence agencies use their powers to spy on economic summits, political dissidents, heads of state and the social media accounts of average citizens around the world. The most disturbing of the revelations are how surveillance agencies are developing strategies to defame and destroy the reputations of those the state deems undesirable.

    I have yet to encounter a writer that can so perfectly encapsulate the arguments not only for privacy but against dragnet, indiscriminate surveillance as Greenwald does in this book. His experience as a lawyer and as a journalist shines through in this scathing indictment of the NSA and the mainstream political media who act merely as mouthpieces for agents of the state who wish to completely eliminate privacy in the digital age.

    Go read this book now.

    Also check out my tags for the NSA, Glenn Greenwald, Edward Snowden, Surveillance and Privacy.

     
  3. 02:52

    Notes: 649

    Reblogged from time-for-maps

    image: Download

    mapsontheweb:

Food shortages in Europe after World War I, 1918.
There was a long electric fence and border patrol put between Belgium and the Netherlands by the Germans that stopped movement from one side to the other.
Bulgaria’s economy was mainly agrarian. It’s main exports were tobacco and grain, so it had both money and capacity to feed it’s population. The stalemate at the Macedonian front helped, in that it prevented a large breach of territory and subsequent destruction of farmland and populations.

    mapsontheweb:

    Food shortages in Europe after World War I, 1918.

    • There was a long electric fence and border patrol put between Belgium and the Netherlands by the Germans that stopped movement from one side to the other.
    • Bulgaria’s economy was mainly agrarian. It’s main exports were tobacco and grain, so it had both money and capacity to feed it’s population. The stalemate at the Macedonian front helped, in that it prevented a large breach of territory and subsequent destruction of farmland and populations.

    (Source: gutenberg.org)

     
  4. 02:49

    Notes: 38

    Reblogged from mediaexposed

    William Binney is one of the highest-level whistleblowers to ever emerge from the NSA. He was a leading code-breaker against the Soviet Union during the Cold War but resigned soon after September 11, disgusted by Washington’s move towards mass surveillance.

    On 5 July he spoke at a conference in London organised by the Centre for Investigative Journalism and revealed the extent of the surveillance programs unleashed by the Bush and Obama administrations.

    “At least 80% of fibre-optic cables globally go via the US”, Binney said. “This is no accident and allows the US to view all communication coming in. At least 80% of all audio calls, not just metadata, are recorded and stored in the US. The NSA lies about what it stores.”

    Binney, who featured in a 2012 short film by Oscar-nominated US film-maker Laura Poitras, described a future where surveillance is ubiquitous and government intrusion unlimited.

    The ultimate goal of the NSA is total population control”, Binney said, “but I’m a little optimistic with some recent Supreme Court decisions, such as law enforcement mostly now needing a warrant before searching a smartphone.”

     
  5. 02:34

    Notes: 1

    Tags: lsdmkultradisney

    It’s kind of sad to see this girl going through all this brainwashing. It’s fucking creepy, too. Some analysis of the video here so you can get a better grasp of the vague subconscious heeby-jeebies that start bubbling up after watching it. 

     
  6. 04:00 28th Jul 2014

    Notes: 512

    Reblogged from wakethesheeple

    (Source: acidbrainfather)

     
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  9. Rep. Thomas Massie, R-KY talks about reading the 28-page document showing Saudi involvement in 9/11. The document was classifed by George W. Bush for “national security only Massie and 2 other Congressmen have read it. Both had similar reactions.

    From an article published last year by Mike Krieger of Liberty Blitzkrieg blog:

    Since terrorists attacked the United States on Sept. 11, 2001, victims’ loved ones, injured survivors, and members of the media have all tried without much success to discover the true nature of the relationship between the 19 hijackers – 15 of them Saudi nationals – and the Saudi Arabian government. Many news organizations reported that some of the terrorists were linked to the Saudi royals and that they even may have received financial support from them as well as from several mysterious, moneyed Saudi men living in San Diego.

    Saudi Arabia has repeatedly denied any connection, and neither President George W. Bush nor President Obama has been forthcoming on this issue.

    But earlier this year, Reps. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., and Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., were given access to the 28 redacted pages of the Joint Intelligence Committee Inquiry (JICI) of 9/11 issued in late 2002, which have been thought to hold some answers about the Saudi connection to the attack.

    “I was absolutely shocked by what I read,” Jones told International Business Times. “What was so surprising was that those whom we thought we could trust really disappointed me. I cannot go into it any more than that. I had to sign an oath that what I read had to remain confidential. But the information I read disappointed me greatly.”

    The public may soon also get to see these secret documents. Last week, Jones and Lynch introduced a resolution that urges President Obama to declassify the 28 pages, which were originally classified by President George W. Bush. It has never been fully explained why the pages were blacked out, but President Bush stated in 2003 that releasing the pages would violate national security.

     
  10. 02:18

    Notes: 2

    Joe Rogan - Society Trap

    nice Dead Can Dance in the background